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Poster: ghostofpig Date: Apr 9, 2007 1:49pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Lost in the ozone

Earlier today, Mr. Tell made a good point. There do seem to be a fair number of one line posts, sometimes followed by a link to a concert. This is not to say that these posts aren't good or shouldn't be or anything negative.

It's just that it is fun sometimes to read about experiences, opinions, shows that one really likes--with a little detail.
Conversation isn't usually one line at a time.

So, in the spirit of Will's request, here's a few paragraphs from my first introduction to the Dead.

1967. Before King, Kennedy, Chicago--before hippie was an overplayed word. I lived in Manhattan in a relatively sheltered existence. I listened to the Beatles, the Stones, Dylan, folk--but I rarely ventured beyond the secure confines of Town Hall or other such reputable venues.
Still, the music was invading the city, and I liked the new sounds--Hendrix, Cream, the Airplane, and this goofy looking bunch known collectively as the Grateful Dead (probably in that order).

A few miles downtown was that forbidden zone known as the Village. Sure--I'd been there in the daytime during an art festival or two under the supervision of ma and pa---but not at night. Then, it happened. One fine Saturday, a friend convinced me that we should go and check out this circus that had everyone talking. So we hopped on the familiar Lexington Avenue train and headed south--south of 42nd street, south to the forbidden zone. We arrived, a couple of goober middle class 15 year olds, disembarked, and started to walk west. As we approached Washington Square Park, we spotted our first hippies. A couple of freaks with long hair, jeans, and a funny cloud of smoke swirling around their heads. Whee, I thought, this must be that reefer stuff I've heard about. We sauntered over to Macdougal Street and the world suddenly changed. First, we entered a genuine head shop. Why on earth would someone want strawberry rolling papers? Oh, I get it.
Incense was burning, black light posters were lit up, and man did we get the stink eye. At least at first. As soon as I bought a pack of those strawberry rolling papers (had to try to look cool), things settled down and everyone went back to their business. The scene on the streets was like a circus--a circus in the crosshairs of time. On Bleeker Street, coffee shops still held reign. Poetry readings, beards--that sort of thing. But on Macdougal, which intersects Bleeker, things were different. Where Bleeker seemed laid back, Macdougal was buzzing with energy. The clubs on Bleeker still had the folkies, but on Macdougal, there was a different kind of sound. We stopped at the small marquis in front of the Garrick Theater. "Mothers of Invention." Hmmm. Zappa. Maybe. Then my eye caught the shine of dayglo coming from the basement--a dingy, crowed place called the Cafe Au GoGo. And there they were, in a black and white photo--the Grateful Dead. Something told us to go downstairs. These scruffy guys with the weird l.p. had to be more dangerous than Zappa.

Down we went, doing our best not to look 15 (no one seemed to care anyway--too stoned). The stairwell was painted in dayglo in the style of Jackson Pollock. Streaks and spatters or red, yellow, blue, orange were glowing like flames, leading to a small room that held maybe 100 people. It was in between sets, and we wandered in with the rest of the crowd, paid our two dollars, and waited.

Then they came out. Ugly as sin--especially the huge biker dude who played organ and harp and snarled the blues. Some scrawny kid who looked like a girl was playing guitar and singing. A blonde mop top was on bass, and there was Captain Trips himself, playing psychedelic blues and singing with a Cheshire Cat-like grin.

I recognized a few songs off the l.p. They did Cold Rain and Snow, Schoolgirl (isn't 15 illegal?), Cream Puff War, Morning Dew, and, at the end of the set, a Viola Lee Blues that lasted forever. There were plenty of songs I didn't recognize, but they were all good. And it was all so sinfully delightful--being in the midst of these dope crazed fiends and getting a contact high off the smoke.

That was it. Whenever I could, I would head down to the Village and check the marquees, trying to catch as many groups as I could. I did go upstairs to see Zappa and the Mothers sweep the stage and throw vegetables around. I saw Hendrix at the Electric Circus, Big Brother, the Airplane, and a bunch of lesser know groups. The scene quickly overloaded by summer's end with more and more kids like me sneaking in from the suburbs. By 1968, the Fillmore East became the mecca for the sixties bands. At first, it seemed huge--but it was a great place for music, and there were no bad seats.

It didn't take much for me to lose myself in this strange new world. And, despite some rough moments and a few scares from the local police, I became an addict. While there was clearly an embarrassment of riches, musically, whenever the Dead's caravan rolled into town, that is where I would be, listening as the music expanded from short songs to longer improvisations.

And now, 40 years later--I can go back in time whenever I want by simply clicking on my computer and listening to a stream--or two.

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Poster: gmcgill Date: Apr 10, 2007 6:20am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Lost in the ozone

For christmas 1969 my friend received the album "The Band" and I received Led Zepplin's first album (both requested of course). We listened to them both day and night. As 14 year olds we bugged our parents about going to a rock concert over the school break. They finally agreed. The next big concert was the Grateful Dead at SMU's McFarlin Auditorium (12/26/69 - Dallas) or Canned Heat at Panther Hall in Ft. Worth (same night). We opted for the Grateful Dead and got dropped off near the auditorium. All we knew was that the main guy was named pigpen. It was an eye-opening experience. "Hippies" all around. Guys selling underground newspapers. Joints being passed around during the show. The show opened with an acoustic set (the drummer was late to arrive). We loved it. Listening to The Band had prepared us to appreciate "roots" music. And although we rejected it at the time because it was our parent's music, we had a good appreciation of "country" music because we were surrounded by it. We made the journey to Dallas and Ft. Worth many times after that, with our parents allowing us to take the bus from our suburban mid-cities location on our own into town. We saw more acts than I can list. Jimi Hendrix in Ft. Worth. Janis in Dallas. The Doors at the State Fair music hall (two shows...saw the late show and Jim was drunk with his back to the audience most of the time). Saw "Yes" as the opening act for 3 Dog Night. A great package show with Lee Michaels, Poco, and others. The Who for both the Who's Next tour and the Quadrophenia tour. Lynrd Skynrd (a new band) opened for the Who on that tour. Some particularly good memories: Bruce Springsteen in 1973 or 74 in a very small nightclub called Gertes (sister club down the street was "mother blues" where Stevie Ray Vaughn played in the "back room" rather than the main act room at the time. Bruce had just released 2nd album and was unknown in our area. But some friends raved about his performance a few days before at the Armadillo World Headquarters in Austin. It was a Sunday night and only about 30 people were there. They put on a high energy show as if they were in a hall with 50,000 people. I'll never forget Bruce blowing the walls out with an encore performance of "walkin' the dog". During the break, the guys just hung out at the bar. I talked to the base player at length about what he thought about Austin. Also saw Tim Buckley in same club (even have many pictures I took that night). He was touring with the "Greetings from LA" album (one of my all time favorite albums) and the energy was incredible. I've heard later that this may have been his last show. He did die within a few days after that. Used to see great bands at the so-called "pillow concerts" at Panther Hall. A classic hard core country place taken over by hippies on these nights. Saw a band there in 70 or 71 called ZZ Top. The first album wasn't released until a few months later. Ahhhhhh......what great memories. Spirit (touring to support the release of "12 Dreams of Dr Sardonicus" at Panther Hall I believe and playing the entire album straight through in addition to lots of other stuff. It was classic. Even saw Bob Weir in the 70s in Panther Hall as the opening act for Wilie Nelson. Another classic honkytonk, The Longhorn Ballroom in Dallas, was the place I saw The Sex Pistols. For any "Texas Music" singer/songwriter fans, I also have great memories of the mid 70s in Dallas seeing all the following in small nightclubs (willis alan ramsey, jerry jeff walker, ray wylie hubbard, BW Stevenson, Doug Sahm, michael murphey, willie, waylon, etc. I recall chatting with Willie Nelson outside the back door of the "Sportatorium" (tin building where they did professional wrestling in the 50s and 60s) as he was getting into his mercedes two seater to drive home after the show. He always has time for his fans. Too much rambling...too many memories. Oh well....off to work. p.s. I discovered the archive site searching for that 12/26/69 dead show (and found it).

This post was modified by gmcgill on 2007-04-10 13:20:10

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Poster: bionic turkey Date: May 15, 2007 1:24pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Lost in the ozone... Appreciating our responsibilities

In regard to all the "lost in the ozone" and the lady who called us "lucky bastards" Mcgill is truly lucky to have been in the DFW music scene and therein lies the responsibility each one of us have when it comes to music and its appreciation. The easy part is learning to play ... harder yet is to be successful and it is practically impossible to be widely or highly regarded. It must be the layman or commoner's responsibility to recognize good works and support them. I did not know Jimi and Janis and SRV and Waylon and all the other dozens of greats I have seen ...I did not know they would be icons in the music business. I had some idea ... but only an idea. There is nothing in the music business that guarantees success like hard work and nothing that rewards like witnessing shows in person. It has to happen on BOTH sides of the stage ... THAT is what makes the stars and the icons in the music world we so revere have that "greater than life persona."

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Poster: BryanE Date: Apr 10, 2007 7:28am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Lost in the ozone

No, please, gmcgill, feel free, in the words of the mighty mighty Zep from II, to Ramble On. Those are great accounts of the halcyon days when live rock was coming into its own. I nagged my parents at the age of 14 to let me go to a concert, and they actually capitulated, allowing me to buy tickets for a Led Zeppelin show. Alas, the tour was cancelled before making its way to our neighborhood. At that time, they were definitely my first choice for my initial concert experience, II being the first album I ever owned. Later the same year as that ill-fated Zep tour, I lobbied again for the chance to see a show, and I was given the grandiose sum of twenty bucks to buy a pair of tickets as a 15th birthday present, resulting in Might As Well being the first song I ever witnessed being performed at a big-time rock-n-roll concert. The Grateful Dead were a tough act to follow that day, but The Who held their own.

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Poster: gmcgill Date: Apr 10, 2007 2:30pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Lost in the ozone

I think Led Zep II was my favorite rock album for many years. I saw them once sometime after III but before IV was released. They played Stairway to Heaven at the show (I know it's hard to put yourself in a place where you have NEVER heard Stairway to Heaven and you're not sick of it, but it was amazing at the time to watch Jimmy Page's playing this new song!)

For the "Who's Next" Tour (or at least after that album was out and before Quadrophenia) I saw The Who in Dallas at Dallas Memorial Auditorium. I had just purchased the new Led Zep IV album. My GF's little brother really wanted this album. I traded him my new copy for TWO 2nd row tickets to The Who. Pete in his white jumpsuit and paratrooper boots. It was an amazing show. Everytime I thought they were playing the last song before leaving the stage, they would play another 45 minutes. They were really on that night.

Another Who story: The Who dallas show behind Quadrophenia release. I had to leave the show early to deal with my GF who was having a really bad reaction to some paper you know what (ended up just fine several hours later but she was really freaking during the show itself and we had to get outside). But my roommate managed to find his way backstage with a full size british flag. He got all the members of the Who (including Keith Moon) to sign both the flag and the album cover from Quadrophenia. Annie Lebowitz was backstage snapping pics for Rolling Stone and several appeared in print with Keith Moon wrapped in the aforementioned British flag.

For many years there was a picture of Pete T. taken by Annie hanging in the "Who" display at the Dallas Hard Rock cafe with the flag draped over Pete's leg and the Quadrophenia album cover in Pete's lap with the marker in his hand signing the cover. (Just last month they closed the Dallas Hard Rock and my former roommate was there and sent me a blurry pic of the "pic" on the wall there). This flag and framed album cover hung on the walls of a series of crummy apartments we shared over the next few years. Over the next few years he had a few other british bands sign the flag. Steve Mariott signed it after a Humble Pie show and made a little "heart" symbol and drew an arrow toward Pete's sig. Sadly, the flag and album cover were stolen years later from my former roommate's apartment. Really sad thing is that this stuff probably got thrown in the dumpster. But the memories are still there.

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Poster: BryanE Date: Apr 10, 2007 5:28pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Lost in the ozone

I was loving the story of the flag until---damn! Given half a chance, the bastards will steal your face right off of your head.

I got my mom to buy Zep II for me when it was their current release and I was about 8 years old. Poor lady had no idea what door she was opening. Many, many years later, even after Garcia died, I discovered something called "blues" music. Perhaps you've heard of it. Apparently there were all these poor sharecroppers from Mississippi who wound up in Chicago and made some records that ended up in the hands of some kids in England. And it wasn't until I really starting listening to, again, it's called "blues" music, or even "the blues," that I really fully appreciated that LZ II album or the fact that Plant wasn't really talking about getting lemonade on his thigh.

Well, actually I had already figured that one out.

For what it's worth, Stairway to Heaven doesn't bother me in the least. The first time I heard it was when it was brand new, and no matter how many hundreds of times I've heard it since, it still sounds fresh.

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Poster: gmcgill Date: Apr 11, 2007 4:23am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Lost in the ozone

The funny thing about blues music to me (and I'm a big fan) is that I was surrounded by real blues music growing up but only learned about the blues from listening to Led Zep, John Mayall, early Rolling Stones, Cream, etc. Hell, I thought Zep and Cream wrote most of the old blues songs they played. It wasn't until later that I learned about the originals. The Deep Ellum section of downtown dallas (hey, there's a Dead connection.....at least an often covered song)was the location of several recording sessions for some classic blues musicians (Robert Johnson and Leadbelly did some of their recordings there I believe).

Turned out that I was surrounded by the blues, particularly the 2nd (3rd, 4th, etc.) generation blues guys in Texas. Stevie Ray Vaughn and Jimmie Vaughn grew up around the corner from me. Freddie King (a giant!) was a regular at Dallas clubs. I used to drive by his house over by Love Field Airport (he wasn't into home improvement....the screen door was broken and hanging halfway off for over a year). John Lee Hooker and Lightnin' Hopkins used to play around town (the club Mother Blues, an old house on Lemmon Ave, played host to many of these classic guys while Stevie Ray Vaughn was honing his chops in the back room. You could also see locals like John Nitzinger ("Baby, if I put your brain on a razerblade it would look like a bb rolling down a 4 lane highway"). By the way Nitzinger was involved in a Ft Worth band called Bloodrock (not a member, but wrote some songs and maybe produced their first album). On Bloodrock II they had their "hit" song D.O.A. A classic (I actually bought the vinyl 2 years ago in a used record shop in Vermont).

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Poster: grendelschoice Date: Apr 10, 2007 8:43am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Lost in the ozone

I never get tired of telling my Grateful Dead origins story. I could probably find an earlier post and just paste it but it's more fun to write about it again.

It's around 1978 or so, I'm 14, and I've just discovered music in the past couple years and got hooked first on the Beatles. Bought all the albums. Pretty good springboard, I guess. But y'know, I know i'll never get to see 'em live. Around this time and age there's nothing cooler than going to a REAL concert, so I start looking around at current bands of the day. What are my choices? Head banger bands like Aerosmith, Foreigner, Journey....My parents are into Fleetwood Mac, so forget them.

Enter my best friend's older brother who's all hippied out (at least a '70s version)...says to us one day "who do you little idiots listen to?",...and I mumbled something about Foreigner, and he laughs and says "listen to this--you'll thank me later", and he puts on AMERICAN BEAUTY. I think the first tune I heard was Friend of the Devil--at least that's the one that stuck out--and I loved it.

I start scraping my lawn mower and snow shoveling money together...Europe '72, Live Dead, Skull&Roses, all on vinyl!!!! quickly follow....by the time 1979 rolls around I've even found crazy stuff on trips into the city with my friend and his brother to Greenwich village music stores, and I've picked up the Farewell to Winterland 3-album set --anyone remember this--w/Jerry on the cover holding up a fat glass of Red Wine and smiling ear to ear???--anyway, I'm constantly waiting for the bus, just ready to jump out of my skin to get onboard & see this band live.

I had no idea Nassau Coliseum was a regular gig. Comes January of '79 and a week before the shows, I get wind of it and my Mom (thanks, Mom!) agrees to chaperone us if we can get tickets (my friend and I were not allowed to go alone--who could blame her?). I think we got tix thru Ticketmaster, which you vould do back then w/relative ease...and we're off.

January 11, 1979. Donna & Keith are still in the band. We enter the Coliseum and i'm both terrified and thrilled beyond belief (I think my Mom was definitely terrified)....heads in colored shirts and skirts twirling thru the hallways...the smell of pot everywhere when not overwhelmed by patchouli....angry looking cops outside on horses....a crush of people like i'd never seen before--everything whirling at me at once....bumping like a pinball in the halls off of bodies and water fountains....a hippie chick runs out of the crowd, points at me and my friend and shouts "Look! Little Dead Heads!!!" (I'm not little, I pouted to my little self).

We find our seats and the lights dim after what seems like an eternity of waiting...a roar goes up, and i'm no longer scared, i'm tingling with anticipation...Sugaree...I Know this song!!!! I'm singing and watching the frenzied dancers all around...and then I remember the EXACT moment when it really clicked--the Bus had come by, but I hadn't really GOT ON until "Jack Straw."

I knew the E-'72 version. It's great.

But this is 1979, and I didn't know they could play the song like THIS. I didn't know they could push the jam to limits that went beyond what my brain thought music could do. I didn't know anyone could DO THAT. I light went on, my body was infused with a glow, an internal heat, and it's dimmed with time, for sure, but it has never been extinguished. I doubt it ever will.

The live show experience ended w/a not very good show (but a great time) in Highgate, VT. summer of 1994. Now I live in Vermont, and that's somehow fitting, because it reminds me that the music never really has to stop, as long as you're alive to hear it and cherish it.

Sorry for getting a little "verklempt". Talk amongst yourselves....here's a topic: Row Jimmy. Just who IS Jimmy...and when IS he gonna get there?


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Poster: gtrclktr351 Date: Apr 9, 2007 7:57pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Lost in the ozone

This will probably get me banned form the forum, but here is my story...
Bought the first album, and liked what I heard. Then I bought AOXOMOXOA, and was sorta hooked. I remained an "official release" head for far too many years, but never lost my desire to see the band. Then Jerry died and I figured I had waited too long. Went to see The Other Ones, and discovered the "trading community". At first, I only wanted the show I had attended, but that changed shortly and I found myself amassing quite a collection(though very meager in comparison). I began lurking at various boards and eventually joined a few. As they say, "The rest is history."

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Poster: BryanE Date: Apr 9, 2007 8:28pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Lost in the ozone

Hey user,

Compared to tons of other inane stuff that floats and flops here, your story has no chance at all of getting you banned. Too bad for you, though, that you never got off the couch and saw a show. The albums are a treasure, but Grateful Dead concerts were the real item.

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Poster: gtrclktr351 Date: Apr 9, 2007 9:07pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Lost in the ozone

There was much more involved that just getting "off the couch". It is a shame I missed out on the "live" experience for so long. On the upside, when I saw TOO Robert Hunter played a set between the two Other One's sets. Also, I attended this show with my adult son(his first Dead-related show)who grew up listening to my Grateful Dead records and cassettes.

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Poster: BryanE Date: Apr 10, 2007 3:42am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Lost in the ozone

No disrespect intended with that line.

I had the pleasure of seeing Mr. Hunter make an unannounced appearance during the second Furthur Festival's St. Louis stop, and he was wonderful.

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Poster: JamminJerome Date: Apr 9, 2007 7:02pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Lost in the ozone

very wonderful post, GOP! I thoroughly enjoyed your story. I wish I had one to share, but since I was only 11 when Jerry died I never got the chance to have a first dead show.

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Poster: BryanE Date: Apr 9, 2007 7:14pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Lost in the ozone

What was your first concert, JJ?

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Poster: JamminJerome Date: Apr 9, 2007 7:26pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Lost in the ozone

Funny enough, I didn't really get into the concert scene until college. I went to a few shows in high school, but due to money issues and overprotective parents, I didn't get to very many, and most of them involved my Church youth group. Saw a few "Praise and Worship" concerts in high school. Saw stuff at local coffeeshops too. There is this philly-based artist that goes by Mutlu who's pretty good who i heard several times.

My first "real" concert in the scene was a Ratdog concert I snuck out to with some hippie youth group friends (the ones that got me into the dead) http://www.ratdog.org/2002-03-08

It was tons of fun, but I wasn't obsessed with the dead at that point. I didn't fully appreciate it, but it was a good place to start. I have to admit that I was pretty weirded out by the whole experience at first, but that changed pretty fast.

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Poster: BryanE Date: Apr 9, 2007 8:10pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Lost in the ozone

Looks like Cassidy had a BUNCH of stuff sandwiched into it. Nice! I went to my first concert having never heard anything by the Dead beyond Truckin' getting played on the radio maybe a couple of times. A couple of months afterward, I found a bootleg vinyl of most of the first set from that show, but some of the songs were labeled incorrectly. Apparently the people who made the record misheard what was being sung, and for the longest time I thought Cassidy was actually called Kathleen. Pretty ridiculous, huh? I also thought The Promised Land was called Beat It On Down The Line. Anybody's guess how they arrived at that. Not entirely unlike the church group outings you attended, I originally bought tickets for the Saturday show, but ended up having to go to a marching band competition that day. Someone told me that I might be able to trade Saturday tix for Sunday's through the local community youth center, which was distributing them for kids in town. The Youth Director was a great guy who flipped a pair for me with no hassle at all. And how nice it was for him to help the town's young people by supplying them with tickets to wholesome activities like Grateful Dead concerts, wouldn't you say?

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Poster: BryanE Date: Apr 9, 2007 6:02pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Lost in the ozone

Ghost,

I really enjoy first-hand accounts of Grateful Dead shows from the early years. Thanks for passing along your introduction to that environment.

I grew up on the west coast and through my adult years gradually migrated to New York, if only for a brief period. By the time I arrived, the Village scene you describe had been a memory for almost 30 years. But that particular bit of real estate, Macdougal/Bleecker/thereabouts, was one of my favorite spots in town. It had been a long time since the Dead and Jimi and Dylan hung out there, but I think they had a lasting impact on that neighborhood. It still maintained an indefinable energy that I believe those guys left there, as Kerouac and his contemporaries did before them.

I was still a boy when you started venturing to the forbidden zone, but I was the same age you were during your first exposure to the Dead on the day when I climbed on board, nine years after you. It was a much different situation than the one you described in that I saw them at a stadium. But I knew from the minute my dad dropped me and my friend off that morning that we were at the type of happening I'd always been looking for, even if always had only been the short amount of time it could be for a 15-year-old kid.

The Oakland sky was typically overcast for a Sunday morning, and the October air was cool. The grey sky set a murky mood, perfect for the mysterious music that lay in store. Back at home that night, echoes of a seemingly perpetual sound that enveloped me for hours filled my head, as I eventually made my way to my bed, where I dreaming lay amazed.

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Poster: rosey842 Date: Apr 10, 2007 10:16pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Lost in the ozone

After reading your post & the others who were there in the beginning through the '70's I could come up w/ several names to call you all. "Lucky Bastards" will suffice. Thanks for the first hand account of what it was like to be there in the early days. Never got to see the Dead, or Who, or Allmans, or Skynyrd in their heyday, but did get to meet Bill Monroe, Jimmy Martin, Mac Wiseman, David Allan Coe, Marty Stuart & George Jones (yes he was drunk--both times.) Unfortunately, we can't help when we were born but we all did get on this bus "one way or another..." The "something that's got to give" is the music that keeps on giving that we all can share & talk about to this day. Thanks everyone for their rememberances. Very cool post, more of what is needed here.

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Poster: William Tell Date: Apr 9, 2007 6:11pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Lost in the ozone

Nice post, GOP...I wish mine were as good. But it ain't.

I grew up with the DEAD, listening first to the first LP, borrowed from an older brother, then to Workingman's, again, from a brother, and then on my own, and then to my first concert in the lean year of 75. Went often, went regularly, but was burned out and disappointed by 82...

Sad, but true.

Was born again, to the early days of CLIFF and others, in the past five years.

Have never left those high energy, high quality vocal times, since.

That is what draws me to the early days...nothing I saw ever came close.

12-29-68 so far surpasses anything I saw that I am almost embarrassed to say it...but that is the way I saw/feel/know it to be...

This post was modified by William Tell on 2007-04-10 01:11:59

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Poster: smi2les Date: Apr 9, 2007 3:23pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Lost in the ozone

Lost in the Ozone, is not that a Gumby line ?

I would love to share stories of the past, present, and future [the Creator willing], but there seems to be an issues with my phone line, so I'm not sure if it's big brother, some corrupt I.D. theft, or someone whom needs a better life and is hiding from the law.

I almost remember being lost in the ozone and a park of Gumby's, but my memory is week, so I'll need to give it alittle parsley to refreshen it.


This post was modified by smi2les on 2007-04-09 22:23:05